Joan named honorary citizen of Singapore

Joan has been named an honorary citizen of Singapore for her significant contributions in developing a safe and sustainable water system in the island nation. 

For the last 14 years, Joan has worked with researchers and government officials in Singapore to help build the country’s water infrastructure and monitor water quality.

“I am honored and delighted to receive this prominent national award,” she said. “I feel extremely fortunate to have played a small part in helping Singapore shape the way the world understands water.

 “As a microbiologist, I believe that the provision of safe drinking water is the basic building block of a healthy and successful society, and I have been very impressed with how Singapore has evolved from a small island struggling with water challenges into a model for sustainable water management through relentless pursuit of research and development,” she said.

The award is the highest form of recognition bestowed by the Singapore Government for outstanding contributions by individuals to the country’s growth and development. It is awarded to those who have made a significant impact in the areas of business, science and technology, information communications, education, health, arts and culture, sports, tourism, community services or security.

Great Lakes’ viral invaders

Viral invasions would make for a good plot in the next Spielberg blockbuster, but according to Michigan State University water researchers, it’s not a Hollywood fantasy. In fact, millions of tiny, dangerous microbes have been attacking native species in the Great Lakes for decades.

These pathogens are hitching rides in ballast water – the water in the hulls of large ships that help stabilize them when on the move – which is then released into new environments when the ships dock at their destinations, according to Joan Rose, Homer Nowlin Endowed Chair in Water Research at MSU.

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Septic tanks aren’t keeping human sewage out of rivers and lakes

The notion that septic tanks prevent fecal bacteria from seeping into rivers and lakes simply doesn’t hold water, says a new Michigan State University study.

Water expert Joan Rose and her team of water detectives have discovered freshwater contamination stemming from septic systems.

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Tracking the viral parasites cruising our waterways

Humans aren’t the only ones who like to cruise along the waterways, so do viruses. For the first time, a map of fecal viruses traveling our global waterways has been created using modeling methods to aid in assessing water quality worldwide.

“Many countries are at risk of serious public health hazards due to lack of basic sanitation,” said Joan Rose, Homer Nowlin Chair in water research at Michigan State University. “With this map, however, we can assess where viruses are being discharged from untreated sewage and address how disease is being spread. With that, we can design a treatment and vaccination program that can help prevent sewage-associated diseases.”

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Quenching the thirst for clean, safe water

It is estimated that one in nine people globally lack access to safe water. Michigan State University researchers are looking to fill that critical need and provide safe drinking water to the most remote locations in the world with a new foam water filter that significantly reduces dangerous pathogens in drinking water.

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MSU EXPERT: PROTECT YOURSELF FROM FLOODWATER CONTAMINATION

Recent torrential rainfall across the United States has led to flash flooding, filling basements with water and sewage that can contain hundreds of pathogens. Joan Rose, Michigan State University's Homer Nowlin Chair in water research, advises that residents should assume floodwaters are contaminated and that exposure to these waters may raise the risk of diarrhea, dysentery, hepatitis, skin and eye infections, and respiratory disorders.

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HELPING FARMERS: MSU NETS MORE THAN $3.9 MILLION IN USDA GRANTS

Michigan State University has netted more than $3.9 million in grants from the United States Department of Agriculture to help Michigan farmers adapt to changing climate, tackle food safety issues, and help small- and medium-sized farms better compete in the marketplace.

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